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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
environment, you will find this layer of chert. it's in all colors, purple, green, red, blue. it's a beautiful rock. . >> one thing i wanted to ask you, the review in the paper recently on sunday said that your book is different from all the other books about the anastazi because you brought out some of the non-flattering parts of their culture like violence. how did you conclude that they were a violent culture? . >> well, i didn't necessarily conclude they were a violent culture, i just concluded there was violence in their culture. the evidence is very clear where you find masker sites, where every place you drop a trench there are bodies, unburied bodies missing their heads, in some cases where there will be a head in one room and you can match it up to the body which is in another room 100 yards away and they didn't just end up there; somebody took the head off. and there will be places where it's all femurs, all gathered together. and places where it's obviously some kind of warfare event where people are all huddled into one spot and they have all been burned there. the record is very c
on our news panel tonight are paul rogers, "san jose mercury news" environment writer. peter hecht, "sacramento bee reporter" and author of "weed land" due out later this year from university of california press. and kara swisher, editor of "all things digital." well, silicon valley's economic growth is outpacing the rest of the state in terms of jobs and per capita income. posting some of the highest numbers since the recession. that according to a study released today at the annual state of the valley conference in san jose. kara, you were there with the movers and shakers in the valley. give us a sense of the mood. are people feeling good about the economy? >> it's the one part of the economy across globally that the u.s. excels in and continues to excel in, and, you know, there's been a lot of job growth in the area, a lot of innovation. some of the stocks are up, not all of them. it's a good time right now especially in an economy that has issued all over the place. >> one of the things that came out in the state of the valley report is san francisco has grown as a tech hub an
advertising? with the most appropriate level and to a shrinking tobacco controlled environment? the we can effectively counter advertise to counteract the effect. thank you. [applause] >> we are going to switch from tobacco and alcohol. we will talk about restrictions and advertising to some degree. before we do that, alex, are you there? maybe he is not there. one of the point i wanted to raise -- specify nothing about advertising does not mean advertising not occur. right now, we have medical marijuana. there is no specification about advertising and lee have dispensaries that advertising in local newspapers. advertising occurs without any specifications with respect to limits or desires. but we think about marijuana policy, it is probably better to think in advance about what sort of advertising the want -- do you want consumers exposed to? not thinking about it means that it will happen regardless. alex, are you on? i think we lost alex. for the moment, we will see if we can get him back. >> i am back. >> great. terrific. no problem. we are ready to handed over to you. >> thank you. th
for the government to tell business you will pay that guy that amount of money. >> i think it is in this environment we need some change and people, again, if you had to look at the bigger picture which i think that everybody is looking at microscopic approaches to thing. we have an economy that's suffering, a deficit. an entitlement program that's in big trouble and getting people off of poverty you have to pay them more, no one is making $9, $18,000 a year, how do you expect people to live on 14,000 a year. stuart: don't expect them to live on that, that's what the minimum wage is for, for people fresh out of high school, getting their very, very first job. not for guys in their 40's and 50's. >> and people coming out of high school don't have to worry about getting a first job because with obamacare and-- >> and haven't got a job, they haven't got a job because of this economic policy. i've got to go. nicole, we are on all time high watch for the dow. we open a bit lower and now we're up a bit. >> i'm going to graduate you because you talked and talked and talked until the dow is back in the gree
? >> well, again anybody's who's been in law enforcement knows it can be a really tough bullying environment for rank and file cops. cops will tell you it's a tough environment. those rigged rules, might sometimes makes right. anybody who's been in law enforcement knows there's a lot of sucking up that the officers have to do. they have to see things they don't agree with and have to deal with that. we'll see if they have some sort of inquiry. it would be good if this were to open up when this current crisis is over, an examination of police departments generally the way they treat their people. the number one complaint of cops in places that i'm aware of is the way they're managed and the way they're treated internally. the public thinks it's about what they do to the cops, but actually, the cops will tell you, they feel mistreated a lot in a lot of police departments. cenk: last question for you. is this still a significant issue within the lapd where they target african-americans or minorities within the force? >> i don't think it's a minority or oh demographic issue at all with the lapd.
to promote that her emotional and create environments for young people and families feel comfortable asking for help. and i'm counting on doctors to the community conversations. the care you provide for patients will always be your first job. today there's many other ways for not yours to make a difference in people's lives, starting with contribute to transformation of our health care system. we've made great progress in the last few years. i look forward to working on that progress in creating a health system that patients, not yours in this country deserve. thank you offer what you do each and every day. [applause] >> up next, the agricultural committee looks at the impact of lester's extreme weather conditions on american farmers. nobel prize winner, robert pulwarty says this year will likely be drier. farmers also testify to the hearing as chair debbie stabenow called for a passage of five-year farm bill. >> well, good morning. the committee will come to order. we're so pleased to have our first session this year and we'll talk about our new members and no one. while we have a quorum,
that kate middleton needs to reware outfits baas it helps the environment. but some say he's picking on the wrong woman. >> can i just say your accent sound like dick van dyke. you can't do english accents anymore. >> neil: people don't know you're from the bronx. >> this is sour grapes. came up with punk, but at the same time -- >> neil: punk fashion? >> yes, but she got rejected by cate kate middleton in 2001 -- >> neil: so she has a judge. is mean to kate middleton she gets a lot of press. and she is introducing a knew new fashion -- neil theme other do we have a picture? >> she is a big -- >> and cate middleton wears many top designers, however she doesn't wear her. this is where you're getting comments from dame vivian about indicate middle don. when she gave the interview she was wearing a t-shirt that said, i am julian a swung. she is claiming that indicate -- kate middleton should not reware her outfits, but because it's good for the environment to rewear your clothes. kate middleton is among the most photographed women in the world, not unlike princess diana. >> i don't have
and his mother a public school teacher. >> so i grew up in an environment where i, hey, you're' going to college and you don't have a choice. >> growing up in the 40's and 50's, do you ever feel like the cards were stacked against you because of the color of your skin? >> no, my parents did a very good job. we never felt as if we were limited in any way whatsoever. >> but the classroom was anything, but natural or easy for guy in high school. an average student, he excelled in math and science, but plodded along in everything else. >> harris: you had a guidance counselor who had doubts how you could move on at the next level. what did she tell your mom? >> i was committed at that time i wanted to be an aerospace engineer and senior year you talk to the college counselor helping you with college education and all of that stuff unfortunately this lady sort of thought that i may not be strong enough to get to college and recommended that i do something else. i ignored her. i think my mother was more upset and didn't let it bother me. >> you had a plan and how you envisioned yourself as a
with families, to life to changes in one's and environment, and to deal with adversity. just think about that. being productive, developing positive relationships with others, adapting to change, like adolescents, for example, dealing with adversity. we saw 30% rate of depression in new orleans after hurricane katrina. so mental health is being able to deal with these life challenges and circumstances and to be productive. it should follow then that mental disorder, mental illness represents alterations in those mental functions such that one is able to carry them out because the mood disorders, thinking disorders, were behavioral disorders. so mental disorders follow immediately from the definition of mental health. i do not want you to take your mental health for granted, because that is what we do. we take our known health for granted, and so therefore, we are not sympathetic when people have mental illnesses, because we have not thought about the fact we could lose it. we do not want to take our mental health for granted. there were five key messages in the surgeon general's report that c
and raped the indians and took all the land. destroyed the environment. but now they are saying that pilgrims are illegal aliens. sure you're sure the -- >> bob: you're sure the whole left is like that? this is what greg does. andrea is guilty of this, too. it's certain people do that. that is a good idea? no, i do not. west of taxpayer money. do i think that the people who came in to force indians off their land and murdered them? >> were you coming over on the may flouer? >> my family came over in chains as enemy of the state. >> dana: then they were part of apartheid or something like that. listen to one more sound bite from this. >> together we make extension of each other's quest. to work for all of us. so thank you, black folks. say thank you, black folks. say america was founded by outsiders. say that. or today insiders. >> dana: i think if i had been an employee and required to go to this, i don't think i would have said any of. that i wouldn't want to go. because i had more important things to do. >> eric: you have to watch it and wonder if he was being outrageous to pr
and took all the land. destroyed the environment. but now they are saying that pilgrims are illegal aliens. sure you're sure the -- >> bob: you're sure the whole left is like that? this is what greg does. andrea is guilty of this, too. it's certain people do that. that is a good idea? no, i do not. west of taxpayer money. do i think that the people who came in to force indians off their land and murdered them? >> were you coming over on the may flouer? >> my family came over in chains as enemy of the state. >> dana: then they were part of apartheid or something like that. listen to one more sound bite from this. >> together we make extension of each other's quest. to work for all of us. so thank you, black folks. say thank you, black folks. say america was founded by outsiders. say that. or today insiders. >> dana: i think if i had been an employee and required to go to this, i don't think i would have said any of. that i wouldn't want to go. because i had more important things to do. >> eric: you have to watch it and wonder if he was being outrageous to prove a point, opposite point. like
% of business owners that were surveyed identified the current environment as a bad time to expand and political uncertainty topped the list for the reasons not to attempt economic growth. lee, a resident of muskogee, oklahoma, and president of acme corporation, said a lot of small businesses had to go in debt to stay afloat. he said now they can't make the money they need to to pay down debts due in large part the environment the government has created. i joined a small group of members in congress. i have faced unprecedented difficulties ensuring my business succeeded. i step on the floor of the united states house of representatives with a firsthand understanding how high the hurdles are for a business to succeed and just simply jump over. last month when president obama was sworn into his second term, i was reminded of something he said four years ago in his first inauguration. the president said, "the question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small but whether it works, whether it helps families finds a job at a decent wage, care they can afford or retirement tha
between our environment and our economy. that really hit home for latinos and for all of us. carbon pollutions from the dirty power plants and saying no to the keystone and tar sands pipeline. [applause] president obama's legacy, his response, his resolve in responding to the climate crisis. the zero oil industry claims that the keystone pipeline is for our energy security. we know that this pipeline is the industry new access to foreign markets and the ability to sell their tar sands from more money. it is win-win for them. what about us? what about ensuring we have what we need to make sure our families have economic security and health security? it's a lot for all of us when it comes to clean air and clean water in our climate. we also keep hearing about these job killing regulations. for millions of americans, especially minority and low-income communities, clean air protections are lifesaving regulations. this is another big reason why environmental issues are registering on the mind of some and a latino families today. we and unequivocal support lowering the pollution from pow
students from school environment. we want to keep them there. we understand all student are not perfect. we want to take you where you are and we're going to work with you. that's a basic fundamental shift in philosophy on how to deal with this behavior in school. and so these three things are perfect examples of what you can do in your own states if you want to take that the. then finally, i want to touch on some of you may have heard of the judge from clayton county, georgia. he's developed a model of collaboration grenadian juvenile courts, the school, the police, and the county social service agency and the county mental health. in essence what they've done is develop a protocol that requires all misdemeanors to be dealt with at school. no more referrals to the juvenile court for misdemeanors. on the first occurrence and on the second occurrence. the first occurrence is a warning. the second occurrence, you were referred to a panel that has community service providers in the county mental health and county social service agency, and you and your family history student, your family needs
are fine. there were some pretty crazy things going on, just because of the enclosed environment and the facilities that everybody was having to go through. some people went off on people. i mean, it wasn't very nice. you just had to do what you had to do. >>steve: you did have to do what you did. and you're home. later today. we understand you're still in where right now? >> i'm still in mobile, alabama right now. >>steve: how are you going to get home? >> my husband with a so loving and kind, he drove all the way, eight hours, from texas to pick me up. >>steve: that is what a husband does on valentines night if he is smart. we're glad everybody is off the boat safely although we did hear one or two people were transported off the boat last night in mobile by ambulance and taken to a local hospital. thanks, brandi. >>alisyn: let's tell you what else is happening. panic overnight in russia after a massive meteorite comes crashing down. [screaming] >>alisyn: those were screams of horror. this happened in mountains. the meteorite streaking through the sky. right now reports show mo
be a virtuous cycle, it saves tax dollars, improves the environment, reduces the damage from flooding, and all the attendant costs. it's a class eck example of what the federal government should learn from 200 years of experience trying to engineer the mississippi river and instead allowing some cases nature to take its course and avoid more expensive and worse damage. and this is what we need to do across the federal government. we don't have to spend twice as much money on health care as most of the developed countries for outcomes that are mediocre at best. we don't have to spend more money on defense than 12 or 13 of the remaining largest defense budgets, and on weapons that in many cases like our nuclear arsenal, but we have far more than we need and can ever use and can afford. we can pare that down, save tens of millions of dollars and still be the most powerful nation in the world. for the outrageous crop insurance that encourages reckless and expensive behavior by paying farmers to plant crops on land that never should have been cultivated in the first place. while we will control spe
learning environment every single day. [applause] michele and i remember how tough it can be to find good child care. i remember how expensive it can be, too. the size of your paycheck should not determine your child's future. [applause] sure none of our kids start out already a step behind. let's make it a national priority to give every child access to a high-quality, early education. let's give our kids that chance. i do have to warn the parents here who have young kids, they grow up to be 5 foot 10 inches, and even if they are nice to you, they basically do not have a lot of time for you on the weekends. [laughter] they have sleepovers and dates. [laughter] so, all that early investment just leads them to go away. [laughter] now, what i also said on tuesday night is that our commitment to orchids' education has to continue throughout their academic lives. from the time our kids start grade school, we need to equip them with the skills they need in a high-tech economy. we are working to recruit and train 100,000 new teachers in the fields of the future, science, technology, engineering
request an immediate end to my solitary confinement and ask to be in a unit in an open prison environment where inmates are allowed outside of their cell also for no lens 14 hours a day. i have been in solitary confinement in the u.s. since february 8th 1995 with no end in sight. i further ask not to be in handcuffs or leg irons when moved outside my cell, end quote. he reportedly claims his due process under the law is being violated because he has no chance to get out of solitary confinement despite 15 years of good behavior in prison. the lawsuit reportedly claims his time in solitary confinement has led to, quote, severe psychological trauma. no comment, though, jenna on the psychological trauma he caused to the families of six killed, and more than a thousand injured in the bombing he plotted along with al-qaida's help. back to you. jenna: fair point there to bring up. julie thank you. jon: a disturbing u.n. report detailing the rice in human rights abuses across war torn syria. according to the findings both government and rebel forces are guilty of war crimes there and the fighting
pushed to ban styrofoam in manhattan. >> it's not just terrible for the environment. it's another thing that's terrible for the taxpayers. styrofoam increases the cost of recycling by as much as $20 per ton because it has to be removed, something we know is environmentally destructive that is costing taxpayers money and that is easily replaceable, i think is something we can do without. >> joining me michael barbareau covers mayor bloomberg for "the no, times." good to see you. >> good to be here. >> he wants to take styrofoam out of new york city stores and restaurants. how feetible is th ibfeasible i? >> entirely feasible. this is like the cockroach of trash. >> the cockroach of trash. >> it never dies, it doesn't biodegrade, it breaks apart, ends up in the water system, being 20,000 tons of it in the city's landfills and he thinks it's unnecessary. >> and we think this is something that he can get done before he leaves office? >> yes. he's had a little more difficulty with banning other things like a 32-ounce soda but this one it appears can he get done through the city council which
the challenges as -- >> yes. >> -- kids growing up in that environment? >> yes. that is the point. they are really going to mature quickly. but also they're going to learn that this new brother i have, maybe he's not so bad after all. maybe he actually brings something into my life, in the way that kids do. first usually by saying i don't know if i like you so much or not. the big part of the story is adventure. it is full-on survivor adventure. >> this is the age group of 8 to 10. >> 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, yeah. the characters are 8 to 13. so right in that range. >> and we know that it continues. you said it's the first of three. they're still stranded? >> oh, yes. they're still stranded at the end of book one. >> okay. survival skills will come in handy. congrats on the show. >> thanks. >> keep it going. >> thanks for having me on. >> jeff probst, thank you so much. >>> coming up next, last-minute valentine's gifts right after this. this is bob, a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a h
-quality learning environment every single day. [applause] michele and i remember how tough it can be to find good child care. i remember how expensive it can be, too. the size of your paycheck should not determine your child's future. [applause] let's make sure none of our kids start out already a step behind. let's make it a national priority to give every child access to a high-quality, early education. let's give our kids that chance. i do have to warn the parents here who have young kids, they grow up to be 5 foot 10 inches, and even if they are nice to you, they basically do not have a lot of time for you on the weekends. [laughter] they have sleepovers and dates. [laughter] so, all that early investment just leads them to go away. [laughter] now, what i also said on tuesday night is that our commitment to our kids' education has to continue throughout their academic lives. from the time our kids start grade school, we need to equip them with the skills they need in a high-tech economy. we are working to recruit and train 100,000 new teachers in the fields of the future, science, technology,
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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